To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are working remotely to continue to meet the legal needs of our clients and prospective clients while also making the health and safety of everyone our paramount consideration. Please call, email or use our website's chat feature to contact our office and discuss your options.

Car Accidents Archives

AAA: teens at highest risk for car crash in summer

West Virginia residents may be interested to hear that the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety has pinpointed a period of 100 days as being the deadliest for teen drivers. This stretches from Memorial Day, the unofficial start of summer, to Labor Day; during this time, the risk for fatal car crashes involving teens goes up an average of 15%. Parents of teen drivers will want to ensure that their teens know safe driving practices.

Many drivers are uninformed when it comes to vehicle safety

An estimated 43 million Americans are expected to travel a distance of at least 50 miles or more during Memorial Day weekend. With so many drivers hitting the road, car accidents are expected to increase. Auto analysts estimate that drivers in West Virginia and across the United States who are traveling in top-rated cars may not be as safe as they believe.

How West Virginia residents can prove driver negligence

Individuals who have suffered a personal injury as a result of a car accident might immediately want to know how to prove that the other driver was at fault. However, proving driver negligence in court is not easy, even if it seems straightforward. For example, there has to be a personal injury or loss attributed directly to the car accident.

Learn the dangers of drowsy driving

Most West Virginia drivers have felt fatigued while behind the wheel at some point in their lives, and they're not alone. According to a recent AAA study, nearly one-third of respondents said they've experienced severe sleepiness while driving within the last 30 days. In 2018, another AAA study found that drowsy drivers were responsible for 9.5% of all wrecks.

Many drivers don't understand semi-automated car tech

The Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making has just published a discussion between a professor of cognitive sciences and a NASA scientist on the subject of automated systems in cars. Specifically, the professionals address how drivers interact with autonomous technology. West Virginia residents should know that half of the cars being manufactured today are at least semi-automated. Some of these cars are relatively inexpensive and, thus, more widely available.

Root Insurance shares results of distracted driving study

Root Insurance, an auto insurer that provides discounts to drivers who avoid phone use, has recently shared the results of a distracted driving study. Conducted by Wakefield Research, the online study brought together the responses of nearly 2,000 drivers in West Virginia and the rest of the U.S. These responses say a lot about distracted driving trends today.

Self-driving cars could pose new safety concerns

Many people in West Virginia are curious about how developing technologies around autonomous vehicles could affect roadway safety. Scientists believe that it may be possible for these technologies to make the roadways safer while eliminating unnecessary congestion. An increasing number of auto and tech companies have joined the competition to produce autonomous vehicles ready for the market. At the same time, there is a significant amount of development work, as well as regulatory changes, that will be needed before self-driving cars are ready to hit the streets.

Radar data finds precipitation raises risk for fatal crashes

West Virginia residents know that precipitation brings with it certain challenges when driving. Previous studies concluded that precipitation can raise the risk for fatal car crashes by anywhere between 10 and 76 percent. Now, researchers at the North Carolina State University have come up with even more accurate, and more startling, data.

Increased U.S. speed limits caused 37,000 more traffic deaths

Higher speed limits have caused more people in West Virginia and across the United States to die in car accidents according to a new study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. The study says that rising speeding limits have been responsible for almost 37,000 additional traffic deaths over the past 25 years.