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January 2020 Archives

Determining who was at fault in a multi-car crash

Car crash victims in West Virginia must determine fault before they consider filing a claim against the driver they believe was responsible. It's a difficult process, especially when victims were involved in a multi-vehicle collision. There are a few ways fault could be determined in such an accident.

West Virginia motorcycle helmet bill runs out of time

Motorcyclists and their passengers are required to wear a helmet in West Virginia, but that would have changed if bills recently introduced in both the Senate and the House had been passed and signed into law by Gov. Jim Justice. Senate Bill 153 and House Bill 2070 would have allowed West Virginia residents who have held a motorcycle license for two years or longer and are at least 21 years of age to operate a motorcycle or ride as a passenger without a helmet.

How blue light can heal patients with concussions

Researchers at the University of Arizona believe they have found an effective treatment for mild traumatic brain injuries, also known as concussions. West Virginia residents should know that there are few treatments for mTBIs besides medicinal methods. They may be interested to find out what the treatment is.

IIHS: rear-seat safety falls behind front-seat safety

Drivers in West Virginia may own a vehicle with all the latest crash mitigation technology. However, they may not realize that this tech usually only benefits front-seat occupants. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety is calling for automakers to enhance the safety of rear-seat occupants as well. This technology includes air bags and crash tensioners, which tighten seat belts in a crash.

FMCSA plans new crash study as trucker distractions rise

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration released the findings of its last large-truck crash causation study back in 2006. Drivers in West Virginia probably understand that a lot has changed since then. Texting and other phone use behind the wheel has grown to be habitual for many drivers, and truckers are becoming distracted by new tech like navigation and fleet management systems.

Red-light cameras save lives but may not have public support

Red-light cameras have encountered a fair share of suspicion and criticism, and some of it is just. For example, some cities do use cameras more as a way of increasing revenue and less as a way of reducing violations and accidents. Yet West Virginia residents should know that the benefits are real.

Traumatic brain injury symptoms and treatments

An average of 138 people die every day from injuries to the brain in West Virginia and across the U.S. Traumatic brain injuries can occur through a blow or jolt to the head or by an object penetrating into the brain. The important point is that TBIs interfere with normal brain function and that those who survive one can be left dealing with long-term symptoms.

How drivers and truck companies can prevent underride collisions

Large commercial vehicles have a substantially different structure than passenger vehicles, which means they can create very different kinds of crashes than smaller passenger vehicles. Many people have heard of jackknife accidents, which involve the loss of control over a commercial truck because of the unstable connection between the cab and the trailer.

The use of hands-free cell devices leads to other distractions

Drivers in West Virginia may be surprised to learn that data reveals that when drivers engage in one distracting behavior, it is likely that they are going to juggle other distractions while they are behind the wheel. The data also reveals that commercial drivers are most likely to use their cell phone when they are driving at about 65 mph.

Insurance companies paying more for dog bite claims

Dog bites have been referred to as a serious public health problem by at least one major insurer. Another insurer paid out $90 million on dog bite claims resulting from around 3,500 dog bites. The Insurance Information Institute reported that dog-related injuries made up a third of homeowner's insurance claim payments in West Virginia and across the country in 2017. The total cost of dog bite claims against homeowner's policies came to nearly $700 million.