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Traumatic brain injury victims often misunderstood

| Apr 3, 2020 | Brain Injury |

In the past few years, important research has led to a better understanding of certain injuries that affect thousands of people nationwide. West Virginia residents who have suffered a traumatic brain injury may be among those that feel like they are often misunderstood by the people around them. A victim’s loved ones may do their best to help, but the effects of such an injury can be hard to explain, and even modern medicine is still trying to grasp the scope of long-term symptoms. 

One reason victims may feel frustrated is that many symptoms that accompany traumatic brain injury do not show up on diagnostic tests, like a CAT scan. Even the brain injury itself may not show up on conventional scans. In addition to the immediate physical pain of a head injury, victims may suffer other symptoms for a long period of time, perhaps even the rest of their lives. 

These ailments can include mood swings, dizziness, fatigue, trouble sleeping and confusion. Medical professionals now acknowledge a link between traumatic brain injury and other problems like homelessness and domestic violence. Victims often express frustration and worry that the people around them do not understand the difficulty they have completing every day tasks that are normally quite manageable, like holding a job, cleaning the house or running errands. 

While medicinal science continues to work towards a better understanding of traumatic head injury, victims may want to take action on their own behalf. If a West Virginia resident suffered such an injury at the hands of another party, he or she may have grounds for a civil case. A compassionate attorney can help a client with the legal process and present evidence to the court that helps explain the suffering a victim must now face each day as he or she attempts to adjust to life with a serious brain injury.