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Scientists develop substance to repair brain injuries

West Virginia residents may be interested to learn that scientists have developed a gel-like substance that could help heal traumatic brain injuries. The substance, called Brain Glue, was created by researchers at the University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center.

Brain Glue is a hydrogel that can fill cavities or holes left in the brain by serious injuries. It provides structure for neural stem cells that are transplanted into the brain to repair damaged tissue, creating the environment they need to settle and replicate. The substance is designed to keep the stem cells within the injured area, enhance their integration and decrease the chances of rejection.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an average of slightly more than 150 people die from TBI-related injuries every day. However, those that survive serious brain injuries often suffer from cognitive impairments, memory problems, movement difficulties and sensation issues. TBIs are also linked to emotional problems and personality changes. Brain Glue has the potential to act as a scaffold for brain-healing agents and compounds, offering patients the possibility of an improved therapeutic outcome.

Individuals who suffer a traumatic brain injury could face a lifetime of health problems. If a brain injury is the fault of another party, such as a car accident caused by a negligent motorist, it may be advisable for the victim to file a personal injury lawsuit to recover compensation. Typical damages sought in such cases include medical costs, pain and suffering and lost income. Victims could learn more about the process by speaking with an attorney.

Source: Medical Xpress, "'Brain Glue' repairs traumatic brain injuries", Aug. 29, 2017

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